Microsoft Launches Power Fx, a New Open Source Low-Code Language

Microsoft today announced Power Fx, a new low-code language that "will become the standard for writing logic customization across Microsoft's own low-code Power Platform," reports TechCrunch. "[S]ince the company is open-sourcing the language, Microsoft also hopes others will implement it as well and that it will become the de facto standard for these kinds of use cases." From the report: Microsoft says the language was developed by a team led by Vijay Mital, Robin Abraham, Shon Katzenberger and Darryl Rubin. Beyond Excel, the team also took inspiration from tools and languages like Pascal, Mathematica and Miranda, a functional programming language developed in the 1980s. Microsoft plans to bring Power Fx to all of its low-code platforms, but given the focus on community, it'll start making appearances in Power Automate, Power Virtual Agents and elsewhere soon. But the team clearly hopes that others will adopt it as well. Low-code developers will see it pop up in the formula bars of products like Power Apps Studio, but more sophisticated users will also be able to use it to go to Visual Studio Code and build more complex applications with it. As the team noted, it focused on not just making the language Excel-like but also having it behave like Excel -- or like a REPL, for you high-code programmers out there. That means formulas are declarative and instantly recalculate as developers update their code. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Launches Power Fx, a New Open Source Low-Code Language
Microsoft today announced Power Fx, a new low-code language that "will become the standard for writing logic customization across Microsoft's own low-code Power Platform," reports TechCrunch. "[S]ince the company is open-sourcing the language, Microsoft also hopes others will implement it as well and that it will become the de facto standard for these kinds of use cases." From the report: Microsoft says the language was developed by a team led by Vijay Mital, Robin Abraham, Shon Katzenberger and Darryl Rubin. Beyond Excel, the team also took inspiration from tools and languages like Pascal, Mathematica and Miranda, a functional programming language developed in the 1980s. Microsoft plans to bring Power Fx to all of its low-code platforms, but given the focus on community, it'll start making appearances in Power Automate, Power Virtual Agents and elsewhere soon. But the team clearly hopes that others will adopt it as well. Low-code developers will see it pop up in the formula bars of products like Power Apps Studio, but more sophisticated users will also be able to use it to go to Visual Studio Code and build more complex applications with it. As the team noted, it focused on not just making the language Excel-like but also having it behave like Excel -- or like a REPL, for you high-code programmers out there. That means formulas are declarative and instantly recalculate as developers update their code.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.