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Exclusive: Apple’s latest competitors are Nothing at all

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Nothing Phone (1) at an angle from Art Basel

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Exclusive: The Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 SSD has up to 64 terabytes of speedy storage – TalkOfNews.com

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The Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 SSD has up to 64 terabytes of speedy storage

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In brief: PCIe 5.0 will soon enable SSDs with more than double the typical read and write speeds of PCIe 4.0 models, but you don’t have to wait any longer. In fact, Sabrent just made a configurable PCIe 4.0 x16 SSD that tops at 64 terabytes of insanely fast storage.

Sabrent is known for its fast and increasingly popular Rocket SSDs, but every now and then the company comes up with some rather outlandish products for NAND enthusiasts and professionals who need the fastest possible storage for scratch files. The latest is the aptly-named Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2, and it combines several Rocket 4 Plus SSDs into a monstrosity that is likely to be just as fast as the money disappearing from your bank account as you place an order for one.

The Destroyer 2 is essentially a carrier board that can take up to eight M.2 SSDs in either a 2242, 2260, or 2280 format for a total of up to 64 terabytes of high-speed storage. It does this with the help of a Broadcom PCIe 4.0 8 series PEX switch, and Sabrent says the eight slots can accommodate both single-sided and double-sided M.2 drives. There’s also a six-pin PCIe power connector for external power, and the SSDs are kept from melting with a full aluminum heatsink and active cooling.

Since it relies on the same Highpoint SSD7540 PCIe 4.0 x16 RAID card as the previous Destroyer, it will be able to reach sequential read speeds in excess of 28,000 megabytes per second. For reference, that is faster than prototype PCIe 5.0 SSDs, which are capable of reaching anywhere from 12,000 to over 14,000 megabytes per second in sequential read tests.

The Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 can also be configured for better data security using a RAID 10 setup or maximum performance using a RAID 0 setup. In any case, Sabrent says installing the drivers is pretty straightforward, and you can configure RAID arrays using a web-based management interface. If you work with large deep learning databases or edit videos at 4K and higher resolutions, this may just make your life easier.

As you’d expect, this solution doesn’t come cheap. Populating all slots with Sabrent’s 8-terabyte Rocket 4 Plus SSD will cost you a small fortune, even at the currently discounted price of $1,499.99 per unit (25 percent off the original price of $1,999.99).

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Exclusive: Samsung's Wildest Design Collabs, From BTS to Supreme – TalkOfNews.com

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Samsung's Wildest Design Collabs, From BTS to Supreme

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There’s nothing people love and hate more than a collab. Whether it’s a fashionable collaboration between two designers, or two musicians teaming up on a “hybrid” kind of musical genre, it’s an easy way to create a fusion to appeal to folks beyond the usual suspects.

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Exclusive: Apple Music’s student plan is getting more expensive in the US, UK, and Canada – TalkOfNews.com

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Apple Music’s student plan is getting more expensive in the US, UK, and Canada

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Apple Music has raised the subscription price of its student plan in the US, UK, and Canada, as first reported by 9to5Mac (via TechCrunch). While it’s increasing the price from $4.99 to $5.99 / month in the US and Canada, student users in the UK can expect a similar jump from £4.99 to £5.99 / month.

Apple hasn’t acknowledged the changes yet, but the new pricing information is currently available on Apple Music’s webpage. Students subscribed to Apple Music have also started seeing the price increase on their iPhones and iPads’ subscription pages. It’s unclear when exactly Apple implemented these changes, but, as 9to5Mac points out, it was likely rolled out sometime between June 21st and the 23rd — an archived Apple Music webpage shows the old £4.99 student price on the 21st.

Apple Music’s student plan, which is reserved for those enrolled in a college or university, was previously the most affordable full-featured plan on offer. Pricing for the $9.99 / month individual and $14.99 / month family plans remain unchanged, and the same goes for the $4.99 / month voice plan. While students might look to the voice plan as a way to save an extra buck, it offers more limited access to Apple Music, as you can only control it through Siri.

Apple Music’s price increase isn’t limited to just the US, UK, and Canada. Last month, Apple quietly upped the subscription price for students across several countries, including Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Israel, and Kenya. It’s unclear whether Apple has plans to raise costs for students in additional countries, and Apple didn’t immediately respond to The Verge’s request for comment.


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