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Exclusive:  Trying the case at the scene of the crime

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 Trying the case at the scene of the crime

#case #scene #crime

The first hearing of the January 6 select committee was a bit unusual.

It wasn’t just the historical import, the primetime national television audience of more than 20 million, or even its content, though that was outside the norm. The committee of seven Democrats and two anti-Trump Republicans does not operate along traditional partisan lines, and their format deemphasized live witness testimony in favor of footage of the attack and clips of depositions.

Instead, it was the location of the hearing that made it unique. The Iran-Contra hearings did not take place at a remote Central American airstrip, nor did the House Un-American Activities Committee convene in Whittaker Chambers’s pumpkin patch. But the committee investigating the attack on the United States Capitol met in the Capitol complex, before a roomful of people who had been in the building that day.

The result was an eerie tension hanging over a committee room where almost everyone there had some sort of direct connection to the events of January 6.

At one table, the journalist wearily responding to Slack queries from an editor had filmed the mob battering down the doors to the Rotunda. In the back of the room, the Congress member intently watching had bunkered down in his office, gripping tight a baseball bat in case rioters made it through his locked door. When clips of the rioters inside the Capitol were shown, those in the room weren’t just seeing the building for its symbolic nature. They saw corridors down which they walked every day. The routes that the attackers took that day on their way to “hang Mike Pence” and hunt down Nancy Pelosi were also paths to a preferred lunch spot or shortcuts to make it to a meeting.

Their memories were not anywhere near as graphic as those of the officers who engaged in hand-to-hand combat that day, like Capitol Police officer Caroline Edwards, who testified about “slipping in people’s blood.” But they were just as visceral.

Of the roughly 20 members of Congress watching the hearings in the room, many of whom had been trapped in the House gallery during the attack, most of them teared up at some point. This wasn’t something they had watched on cable news. It was something they’d lived.

Rep. Madeleine Dean (D-PA) recalled to Vox the memory of seeing her colleague Rep. Paul Tonko (D-NY) get “clocked” in the cheek that day. The assault didn’t come from a rioter but a fellow member, who accidentally whacked him during the mad scramble over railings to escape the gallery as members tried to flee while simultaneously fumbling to put on their gas masks.

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There will be a half-dozen more hearings by the committee, and those will be different, too. They may not get the same attention or audience. There may be fewer reporters, fewer members of Congress who clear their schedules to attend, and fewer special guests who have become the faces of that day, like former DC police officer Michael Fanone and current Capitol Police officer Harry Dunn. Future hearings will focus on issues in addition to the events of that day: Monday’s scheduled hearing will feature former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt as the committee explores Trump’s knowing embrace of lies around the 2020 election. Viewers are far more likely to see footage of the hair dye dripping down Rudy Giuliani’s face than that of the blood that stained the corridors of the Capitol.

That doesn’t mean there won’t be other potential drama. No matter the topic of the hearing or the crowd in the room, tension is always there. There could be a defining moment, like when Joseph Welch asked Sen. Joseph McCarthy “Have you no sense of decency?” or a stunning confession, like when Alexander Butterfield told the nation about Richard Nixon’s White House taping system. And, of course, there’s always the potential for a member of Congress to go on a long, self-aggrandizing monologue. But this set of hearings will always have an edge that sets it apart: the committee isn’t just convening in the halls of Congress. It’s meeting at the scene of a crime.


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Exclusive: Recession Talk Surges in Washington – TalkOfNews.com

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Compelling Television

#Recession #Talk #Surges #Washington

“From Wall Street to Washington, whispers about a coming economic slump have risen to nearly a roar as the Federal Reserve ramps up its battle against the highest inflation in four decades,” Politico reports.

“Price spikes and the Fed’s aggressive interest rate hikes sent the benchmark S&P 500 stock index tumbling to its worst performance in the first half of the year since 1970. Consumer confidence has sunk to record lows. And economists are increasingly worried that a downturn will not only happen but happen soon — a danger underscored by one widely watched Fed growth tracker.”

“Fed Chair Jerome Powell has begun saying the quiet part out loud: The central bank is willing to tolerate a recession if it means getting inflation under control.”

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Exclusive: MUST SEE: Hot Dog Eating Champ Joey Chestnut Takes Down Animal Rights Protester in a Choke Hold With Mouth Full of Weiner Before Winning Contest (VIDEO) – TalkOfNews.com

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MUST SEE: Hot Dog Eating Champ Joey Chestnut Takes Down Animal Rights Protester in a Choke Hold With Mouth Full of Weiner Before Winning Contest (VIDEO)

#Hot #Dog #Eating #Champ #Joey #Chestnut #Takes #Animal #Rights #Protester #Choke #Hold #Mouth #Full #Weiner #Winning #Contest #VIDEO

National Hot Dog Eating Champion Joey Chestnut won the 2022 Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest on the 4th of July today but not before he took down a protester.

The annual hot dog swallowing event is held on Coney Island every year on Independence Day.

Joey is currently ranked No. 1 in the world by Major League Eating.

Chestnut won his first Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest in 2007 defeating Taer “Tsunami” Kobayashi.

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On Monday, during the middle of the competition, an animal rights protester ran up on stage next to Joey Chestnut carrying a sign reading, “Expose Smithfield Deathstar.”

When the protester jumped on stage next to him Chestnut wrapped his arm around the protester’s neck and took him down to the ground.

This all took place while Joey was chewing on hot dog.

He went on to win the competition.

Here’s the video.

Joey Chestnut obliterated the far left protester with a mouth stuffed full with hot dogs and buns.


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Exclusive: In praise of the great outdoors, wherever that may be for you – TalkOfNews.com

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#praise #great #outdoors

I’m truly lucky to live in one of the most beautiful places on the planet.

Sometimes I think the only thing keeping me alive in the face of an ongoing pandemic, intensifying climate crisis, and many, many more issues worsening with a swiftness is the outdoors. I’m not saying I’m holding onto this mortal coil for dear life, but instead that I see meaning in the life I’m living thanks to my surroundings. I can think of so many moments when clearing my head meant a walk to the river, a run on the Lafitte Greenway, or getting away even farther and exploring more of the place I love and call home. Once I’ve hit the road and I’m walking through the swamps of the Barataria Preserve, it’s like the chaos of the world cannot reach me. Mosquitos can, which isn’t great since they inexplicably love me, but my worries are just as small as they are when I’m out in nature. Quite literally taking a hike is the only way I can imagine celebrating this 4th of July.

Exploring nature is something I’ve only recently come around to in my adult life, and that may be because often the folks we assume are hitting the trails are their own stereotype. Typically, the most visible people heading outdoors are white, cis, able-bodied, and have enough money to afford the luxury of time and equipment for all sorts of terrain. But a whole host of grassroots and more formal organizations are making it possible for people from a diversity of backgrounds to feel more comfortable when they head out into nature. Field Magazine has a great resource for BIPOC groups blazing a trial—I’m personally obsessed with Latino Outdoors. The publication also offers great resources for LGBTQ+ hikers. And disability advocates can take comfort in the amazing work Disabled Hikers is doing, though certainly more can be done so that all are welcome to this space.


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