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Exclusive: Do 'Old White Guys' Work for You? You'll Want to Follow This Lawsuit

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Do 'Old White Guys' Work for You? You'll Want to Follow This Lawsuit

#039Old #White #Guys039 #Work #You039ll #Follow #Lawsuit

We’re going to talk in a moment about your business, and the people you have working for you. But first, we’re going to mention a word very few business leaders like to hear.

Let’s set the stage. In the year 2000, a 38-year-old former senior manager with EY named Joseph DiBenedetto landed a new job as a director in the tax department at AT&T.

Things were good, by all accounts. DiBenedetto rose through the ranks: first to executive director, and then assistant vice-president. He got good reviews and merit-based compensation awards, according to a lawsuit. 

(There’s that word again.) 

After 20 years, however, when DiBenedetto was in his late 50s, h’s career hit a wall. According to court documents in his lawsuit, the chronology went something like this:

  • July 2020: DiBenedetto learned that his boss was about to retire, and he expressed the hope that he might be promoted. But, he was told tht as “an old, white male with not enough ‘runway’ left in his career,” his chances were slim.
  • Around the same time, AT&T’s chief finance officer sent a department-wide email about “attracting and retaining diverse employees throughout our organization, especially at our senior levels,” which included “bar graphs and charts showing the race, ethnicity, and gender composition of the Finance Department.”
  • Two months later, September 2020: DiBenedetto learned that not only would he not be promoted, but that he and a dozen other employees in the tax department (all of them white and over age 50, as he was, and nine of them male), would lose their jobs, supposedly due to “numbers related” reasons.
  • October 2020: During DiBenedetto’s last few weeks on the job after getting his termination notice, top executives led a webcast in which they said AT&T would be “doubling down” on its diversity and inclusion efforts, and “planned to hold [senior leaders] accountable” with quarterly reviews.
  • Later that month: AT&T’s CEO reported on the company’s recent performance, stating among other things: “We announced strong third-quarter results this morning,” and reporting the company’s “solid third quarter” in a webcast.

Piecing it together, DiBenedetto, whose last day at AT&T was November 2, 2020, says it suggests his employer used financial performance as an excuse–one that didn’t even turn out to be true, if you believe the CEO’s quarterly report just weeks after DiBenedetto had been told his position would be eliminated.

(AT&T disputes the allegations and says it will continue to fight in court: “Reducing our workforce is a difficult decision that we don’t take lightly, and each instance is reviewed thoroughly to ensure there is no discrimination of any kind,” the company said in a statement to multiple news organizations reporting on the case.)

Now, these kinds of disputes and lawsuits happen all the time. But the DiBenedetto lawsuit against AT&T has now been allowed to go forward by two judges: first, a federal magistrate in MAy and now a federal district court judge in Atlanta. 

That means it’s become a case that just about any company committed to diversity should watch, perhaps especially if your more senior employees aren’t as diverse as your newer hires, and especially if your efforts focus on eliminating employees instead of recruiting new ones.

To be sure, nobody involved in this case — least of all the judges — suggests that diversity and inclusion are unworthy corporate goals. And I have no idea how this will turn out as the case progresses.  

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But the pitfalls DiBenedetto alleges are pretty clear.

“If you follow a valid affirmative action plan that’s focused on goals and not quotas, and you’re dealing with hiring and not firing and it has some sense of a time element, if that’s done, then it’s lawful,” Stewart Schwab, a Cornell University law professor, told CBS News in its reporting on this case, adding that in this case, “It does sound like some uncareful things were said to him … And this person was fired, so that’s a big deal.”

The major takeaway seems to be that if you hope to increase diversity and inclusion, that’s wonderful–but make sure you do it “by the book,” and in a way that won’t risk creating more legal problems for you down the road.

Nobody wants their business to become entangled unnecessarily in lawsuits. The only thing worse? Becoming known for the lawsuit, rather than what you want people to think of when they think of your business. 

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.


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Exclusive: Leading With Transparency in Times of Uncertainty – TalkOfNews.com

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Leading With Transparency in Times of Uncertainty

#Leading #Transparency #Times #Uncertainty

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

While not a new concept, the importance of transparency in the workplace took on more urgency during the pandemic as our daily lives, including our work environment, were upended. Worldwide, both within the workplace and outside of it, uncertainty became the norm rather than the exception across many influential sectors: geopolitical, natural and business. And there are no signs of things calming down anytime soon.

In a volatile climate, organizational transparency becomes more essential to your business success. As your employees cope — or attempt to cope — with constant upheaval and uncertainty, helping to foster stability toward mental health is of prime importance. Any reassurances you can offer your teams will go a long way in stabilizing their anxiety levels, at least regarding the workplace since external factors are most likely beyond your control.

Ask yourself: If your management team is not leading with transparency, what is your response to the uncertainty? Are you then leading with opaqueness? What does that mean for our employees?

Related: Six Strategies To Navigate Through Uncertainty

Transparency vs. opaqueness

Transparency facilitates a more open, less hierarchical approach to management and a culture that tilts toward learning and innovation. It assumes that data and information will be of value to people. A culture of transparency helps to decentralize information, and with the right information, we’ve witnessed individuals become leaders.

The more employees connect to your company’s overall business objectives, the more room is given for inspiration to arrive. Transparency allows for ownership and alignment, enabling the business to unlock growth. In addition, it encourages individuals to take ownership of problems and mistakes, solutions and their departments. It discourages finger-pointing. It is evidence of mutual respect between the organization and its employees.

In this environment, employees stay connected to what is happening within the organization and don’t have to spend valuable time questioning the company’s direction or plans. If a problem develops, the focus stays on solving the problem versus spiraling into a perceived cover-up and becoming part of the subsequent rumor mill churn.

Organizations led by transparency foster a culture that acknowledges we don’t have all the answers and are learning together as the business grows.

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Related: Five Actions Leaders Should Take In Times Of Uncertainty

On the flip side, opaqueness assumes hierarchy. The lack of transparency permeates the organization, causing silos and territorial fiefdoms. Opaqueness facilitates a culture that guards information and knowledge and instructs people what to do instead of providing opportunities to lead. There’s no ownership by employees. There’s the leadership team and everyone else.

Here are some tactics your organization can leverage to foster a culture of transparency.

  • Document your vision, strategy and goals. Openly state these north stars, even sharing them externally, instead of having people guess or make them up for you. This level of visibility will ensure the alignment of your go-to-market strategy with your vision, mission and goals.
  • Share internally how the business is meeting its goals. Measure how the business is performing monthly or quarterly against a transparent plan that you’ve put in place. Share OKR (objectives and key results) reporting of how the company is performing. Use this information to foster a culture of learning. At PandaDoc, we understand that some of these OKRs will fail, but we let everyone know it’s okay as long as we learn from our mistakes.
  • Regularly schedule all-hands meetings. Implement these meetings at the company and at departmental levels. Schedule “ask me anything” meets with leaders so employees can voice their questions or concerns. PandaDoc’s all-hands have a cadence to them. We publish a calendar of what we’re going to discuss; for example, a monthly or quarterly business review, an OKR review, show and tell and what’s happening in various departments. We also structure time to talk about things happening in the world that impact us.
  • Schedule sprint reviews. Have departments share their accomplishments within a designated time — for example, over the past month. Record and post these on your company website so everyone in the company has the opportunity to view them. At PandaDoc, we invite our entire company to join our weekly product and engineering sprint reviews.
  • Create a culture where your employees feel safe. Not every employee feels confident enough to ask leadership-related questions during an all-hands meeting. Provide structured ways to encourage the questions. Let your employees know that they can have one of their co-workers ask the question on their behalf. It’s a simple way of letting your employees know that you have their back, and it provides a way for all employees to have their concerns addressed.
  • Take note of what other companies are doing. Software developer GitHub, for example, is implementing some innovative ways to promote transparency. Two that come to mind: They publicly expose their employee onboarding and offer a two-week CEO shadowing opportunity for employees.
  • Understand that you don’t have to share everything in real-time. You might not want to share a new development in real time; some may require a well-thought-out plan. But you do want to get in front of the rumor mill before your employees start to have that nagging feeling that something is wrong. And definitely, before the information is available on the internet. Share as quickly as possible what’s happening, and what the plan is so your employees can decide their next steps. Sharing this information helps cultivate mutual respect.

As you think about leading with transparency, it’s critical to note that your business is already transparent, even if you don’t want it to be. There’s no point in hiding negative information. It’s going to come out. And you don’t want the information shared on Twitter before you’ve shared it with your employees. A better business practice is to embrace and lead with transparency to foster a more positive working environment for everyone.

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Exclusive: Airlines, FAA spar over flight delays as crucial Fourth of July weekend approaches – TalkOfNews.com

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Airlines, FAA spar over flight delays as crucial Fourth of July weekend approaches

#Airlines #FAA #spar #flight #delays #crucial #Fourth #July #weekend #approaches

Travelers wait to board a plane at Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, on April 22, 2022.

Daniel Slim | AFP | Getty Images

Airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration are pointing the finger at each other over a rising rate of flight cancellations and delays, just as millions prepare for a July 4th travel weekend that officials expect to be among the busiest in three years.

On Friday, Airlines for America, which represents the country’s largest airlines, including Delta, American, United and Southwest, requested another meeting with Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg to discuss air traffic controller staffing for the summer and other potential obstacles like space launches and military exercises.

“The industry is actively and nimbly doing everything possible to create a positive customer experience since it is in an airline’s inherent interest to keep customers happy, so they return for future business,” Airlines for America CEO Nick Calio wrote in the letter.

Airlines have grappled with staffing shortages after travel demand bounced back faster than they were prepared for, despite government aid that prohibited them from laying off workers during the pandemic. Plus, the Covid-19 slowed training of air traffic controllers.

Both factors have made it difficult to navigate routine issues like thunderstorms during the spring and summer as Covid-19 infections continued to sideline employees and frustrate travelers eager to vacation.

U.S. airlines have reduced their June-August schedules by 15% compared with their original plans, the letter from Airlines for America said.

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United on Thursday announced it will cut 50 daily flights from its Newark Liberty International Airport hub in New Jersey starting next month in an attempt to ease congestion and delays there. Delta, JetBlue, Spirit and Frontier airlines have also trimmed schedules.

The FAA shot back at airlines for urging thousands of employees to take buyouts or leaves of absence during the pandemic, despite federal aid.

“People expect when they buy an airline ticket that they’ll get where they need to go safely, efficiently, reliably and affordably,” the agency said in response to A4A’s letter. “After receiving $54 billion in pandemic relief to help save the airlines from mass layoffs and bankruptcy, the American people deserve to have their expectations met.”

The FAA has said it has beefed up staffing at a key air traffic control center in Florida and that it added alternate routes to ease congestion.

Brett Snyder, founder of the Cranky Flier travel website, said: “It’s hard to assign fault because everyone’s at fault.”

“Because demand is so high, the airlines are trying to fly as much as they can,” Snyder said. “People think fares are high now, imagine if airlines flew less.”

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Exclusive: Why niche markets can be big business for accountants – TalkOfNews.com

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Why niche markets can be big business for accountants

#niche #markets #big #business #accountants

John O’Donnell, a practice consultant at ICAEW Members’ Department, explains what he sees as the many benefits of specialising as an accountant. 

Finding a niche is an excellent way for accountants to unlock new, profitable opportunities. 

So it’s no surprise to hear that more and more practices are identifying and focusing on niche markets as a way of optimising budgets and boosting internal efficiency.

Here’s what we cover in this article:

What do we mean by a niche market?

Many firms will say “I specialise in SME clients” without realising that most other practices will say the same thing.

As such, their clients have little to differentiate them from their competitors.

Defining yourself as a niche firm, servicing a niche market, is a way to help you stand out from the crowd.

While brand image, good marketing and so on can help you celebrate your unique selling points, perhaps one of the most effective ways is to focus on one or more niche markets, a move that brings additional advantages too.

What are the advantages of serving niche markets?

There are two fundamental advantages to serving niche markets and specialising as an accountant:

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  • Optimised marketing
  • Internal efficiency.

From a marketing perspective, you can become one of the ‘go-to’ firms for clients in your sector and focus your marketing budget accordingly.

This will be more effective than a general ‘scatter-gun’ approach and should bring greater success.

Networking can be more targeted too. If the niche sector has conventions or meetings, you can attend these and expand your client base.

Marketing via publications (such as the magazines or articles your niche uses) can also be quite focused, to make the public aware of your firm and specialisation.

The second advantage is in the area of internal efficiency and will help improve profitability considerably.

If you’re processing accounts and tax returns for similar clients, you can use efficient processes.

This should be considered carefully in your staff recruitment, operational requirements and software choices, ideally prior to marketing yourself in this niche in the first place.

You should also consider informing clients in the sector of the way you want them to keep their records (to make both your and their job easier) and incorporate this into your engagement terms with them.

Are there other considerations?

If you focus on a transactional specialisation (such as corporate finance or strategic tax advice – as opposed to providing compliance advice), your income may not be recurring.

Therefore, you may need a good network of client providers who recognise your expertise so they provide clients referrals and ensure you have a continuing supply of new business.

Are there any disadvantages to tapping into a niche market as an accountant?

There may be, particularly with changes to tax and accounting requirements.

Concentrating all your efforts in one area may also leave you vulnerable to economic change – for example, if a particular sector is hit by a recession.

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One particular specialisation years ago (dealing with small subcontract builders) was affected quite significantly by a change in tax laws.

So your niche may lead you to need to swiftly rethink your firm strategy.

How do I turn my practice into a niche firm?

Consider areas where you are technically competent or have an interest.

We also recommend that you plan carefully in terms of resource and put together a strategic plan for expanding your practice.

We have advised accountancy practices in this area in the past (from sole practitioners upwards) in order to ensure they plan for their futures.

So consider the following: will you need to recruit additional staff? How senior do they need to be? Are they available or close to you?

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