Connect with us

Business

Exclusive: Daily Crunch: Apple’s M1 chips have an ‘unpatchable’ hardware vulnerability, say MIT researchers

Published

on

MIT researchers uncover ‘unpatchable’ flaw in Apple M1 chips

#Daily #Crunch #Apples #chips #unpatchable #hardware #vulnerability #MIT #researchers

To get a roundup of TechCrunch’s biggest and most important stories delivered to your inbox every day at 3 p.m. PDT, subscribe here.

It’s Friday, June 10, 2022, and Haje is on the road, so it’s just me today. Before I let you enjoy the weekend, there are a few housekeeping items to address. First, TechCrunch Disrupt will be in person this year, and today is the last day to raise your hand to speak. Second, if you’re attending TC Sessions: Climate next week, we have your inside look on what to expect. Now that those are taken care of, if you’re in the mood to listen to something instead of read, we have you covered. Have a great weekend! — Christine

The TechCrunch Top 3

  • Pacman on the attack: Carly writes that MIT researchers, while applying a “Pacman attack” test on Apple’s M1 chips, undiscovered a doozy in the way of an “unpatchable” hardware vulnerability that could allow attackers to break through its last line of security defenses. In its response, Apple didn’t seem too worried.
  • Amazon isn’t bidding on cricket: Manish was privy to some news that Amazon was pulling out of the running to bid on a 5-year deal to stream IPL cricket games. No word on why that is, but if you enjoy the games, it looks like Disney and Reliance are still in it.
  • “The search for alpha”: A downed market for crypto appears to be an advantage for hedge funds looking to get in on some digital assets, Jacquie writes. She combs through the PwC’s Global Crypto Hedge Fund so you don’t have to.

Startups and VC

We enjoyed Amanda’s and Natasha’s take today on the myriad layoffs plaguing technology companies these days. They also point out something new with this latest crop of announcements.

What do you get when you combine a young VC investor leveraging his age to bring a fresh perspective to the industry with some women investors striking it out on their own and a look into investors demanding profitability from tech companies? A nice afternoon of reading.

Here are some others we hope tickle your fancy:

  • The subscription game is the game I’m in: Free messaging app Telegram is going to offer a premium option, and get this, it won’t be downgrading features for those who don’t subscribe. Now, isn’t that refreshing? Your move, Marco Polo.
  • Getting in on a growing market: The International Finance Corp. is poised to invest in Partech’s Africa Fund II, Annie reports. The fund will invest in a broad range of stages, from seed to Series D.
  • A hand to hold: Boulder Care raised $36 million in Series B funding to continue developing its telehealth program focused on substance abuse disorders. The company works mainly with patients on Medicaid and is seeing some industry-leading retention rates for those in the program.
  • Sunny days are here again: India’s SolarSquare has raised $4 million to accelerate the country’s move toward clean energy.

Growth marketing experts survey: How would you spend a $75,000 budget in summer 2022?

As entrepreneurs began turning lessons learned in bootcamps into basic best practices, startups started giving growth marketers more respect and resources over the last decade.

Here’s the good news: Managers can’t slash your respect budget. Unfortunately, to maximize ROI, every dollar now needs to stretch further than Reed Richards in the last “Doctor Strange” movie.

This time, we asked four experts to tell us how they’d manage a budget of $75,000 and which recommendations they’d offer someone who had only $10,000 to spend:

Advertisement
  • Ellen Kim, VP of Creative, MarketerHire
  • Jack Hallam, growth and community lead, Ammo
  • Jonathan Metrick, chief growth officer, Portage Ventures
  • Jonathan Martinez, founder, JMStrategy

(TechCrunch+ is our membership program, which helps founders and startup teams get ahead. You can sign up here.)

Big Tech Inc.

  • Turn down that racket!: Netflix is turning some of its popular original programming into games, like “The Queen’s Gambit,” “Shadow and Bone” and, yes, “Too Hot to Handle.” And now, more Disney fans in the Middle East and Africa will now have access to Disney+. Meanwhile, Peacock confirms it is testing a rewards program for paid subscribers that involves movie tickets or movie rentals.
  • You make me wanna roll my windows down and cruise: The weekend is upon us, and we hope you live in an area where you can roll the car windows down and enjoy the breeze. If not, here is some car news to enjoy with the air conditioning blasting. Porsche is working with UP.Labs aimed at creating six tech companies that will focus on some of the automaker’s goals, including predictive maintenance, supply chain transparency or digital retail, Kirsten reports. Over at Faraday Future, the electric vehicle startup has another federal agency inquiring about its actions.
  • Some social media headaches relieved: In social media news, you may remember that Twitter was testing a Report Tweet flow that would add more options for explaining what the issue is when flagging offensive or dangerous content on the site. That test worked, and now Twitter is rolling it out. Next, Meta is rolling out Horizon Home as part of a new update to the Quest 2 headset. Apparently Quest 2 wasn’t making it easy for people to meet up in the metaverse.


Business

Exclusive: This Simple Exercise Will Help You Turn Failure Into Success – TalkOfNews.com

Published

on

By

This Simple Exercise Will Help You Turn Failure Into Success

#Simple #Exercise #Turn #Failure #Success

If you want your business or your career to be a big success, rather than focusing only on the positive, you should also look closely at your failures. In fact, you should write those failures up and create a “rejection resume.” That advice comes from Eli Joseph, Ph.D., faculty member at Columbia University and Queens College and author of The Perfect Rejection Resume.

A rejection resume is straightforward to create, as he explains in his book. Ask yourself the same questions you’d answer in a traditional resume–but in reverse. Instead of saying where you graduated from, list the schools you applied to but didn’t get into, or the ones you dropped out of, or the courses you failed. Instead of listing the jobs you succeeded at, describe the ones you were fired from, the projects that crashed and burned, and the biggest mistakes you made. The result will be a brief document, a few pages long or maybe just one page, that contains a record of your biggest disappointments, and the biggest mistakes you’ve made.

What’s the purpose of the rejection resume? “Most people do not like to talk about their failures and how many organizations rejected them or how many venture capitalists rejected their proposals,” Joseph explains. “So it’s just a conversation starter.” That is, it can help you start a conversation with yourself. “To say, hey I have this document, and I can take advantage of these lessons.”

Here are some ways a rejection resume can benefit you.

1. It can help you turn current failures into future successes.

“As you’re building a business, you can write down, ‘I failed today at this task, and it was partially detrimental for now, but I’ve learned from my mistake.’ And look around as you go along.” With this approach, the rejection resume can become a powerful motivational tool, he says, because if you look at your failure, you may be able to see the mistakes that led you there. And you can choose not to make those mistakes in the future.

2. It can let you see how far you’ve come.

Anytime is a great time to create a rejection resume, Joseph says, but it’s an especially useful thing to do if you’ve suffered a disheartening setback. “It’s the one that stings a little bit, and you know, that’s what we need to harp on and focus on. So we can bookmark that time that we felt down from a particular failure, but we’ve rebounded.”

His comment makes me think about my attempt, decades ago, to work as a business reporter for a daily newspaper, the only job from which I’ve ever been fired. I hated the job and was actually delighted to leave it, but it also felt like a colossal failure. With hindsight I can see that it was completely the wrong fit for me and how losing that job was in many ways a piece of very good luck.

Advertisement

3. It will help you connect with others.

“People always love a comeback story,” Joseph says. You may prefer to focus on your successes, but in fact, you almost certainly have your own comeback story and your own history of failure before success, he says. “And people always love that. They love the underdog.”

This is why, he says, if you share part of your rejection resume story on social media, it’s likely to get a lot of attention. “It’s a good marketing tool,” he says. “People who do speaking engagements and keynotes tend to reel the audience in through their personal endeavors and how they’ve overcome failure.” The rejection resume can help you organize that information so you can help others learn from your experiences, he said.

There’s a growing audience of Inc.com readers who receive a daily text from me with a self-care or motivational micro-challenge or tip. (Interested in joining? Here’s more information and an invitation to an extended free trial.) Many are entrepreneurs or business leaders and many have told me about how even devastating failures have helped lead them build bigger, more meaningful successes. Seeing your failures as something to be commemorated in a rejection resume can be a great start.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

Continue Reading

Business

Exclusive: Mystery rocket makes moonfall – TalkOfNews.com

Published

on

By

Mystery rocket makes moonfall

#Mystery #rocket #moonfall

Hello and welcome back to Week in Review, where we recap the biggest stories from the week. If you want this in your inbox every Saturday, sign up here.

Greg Kumparak is still on vacation, but not to worry! He’ll be back at the helm next week to bring you our biggest stories. Until then, I’ve got you covered.

First for some quick business. TechCrunch+ is having an Independence Day sale, which gets you 50% off on an annual subscription. Need more? TC+ Editor-in-Chief Alex Wilhelm gives you all the reasons to take the plunge here.

Okay let’s go to the moon! Yes, the moon. Some space junk crashed to the lunar surface this week, causing some enthusiastic observers to scratch their heads. Was it from SpaceX? Was it from a rocket launched in 2014 by the China National Space Administration? We still don’t know, but Devin Coldewey had a chat with Darren McKnight from LeoLabs, which has built a network of debris-tracking radar, to get some more insight.

Image Credits: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University

other stuff

Speaking of space: Ever want to stare longingly into the depths of the universe and actually have something stare back? This is supposed to happen in two weeks when the James Webb Space Telescope will release its first images. “This is farther than humanity has ever looked before,” NASA administrator Bill Nelson said during a media briefing this week. Maybe the truth is out there.

Tesla Autopilot layoffs: The automaker this week laid off 195 employees across two offices in its Autopilot division. Those who were laid off filled supervisor, labeler and data analyst roles. Questions persist about what impact the layoffs will have on Tesla’s wider advanced driver assistance system. The remaining 81 staffers on the Autopilot team will be relocated to another office, as the San Mateo office will be shuttered.

SPAC subpoenas: A New York-based federal grand jury sent subpoenas to the board of Digital World, which is preparing to acquire Trump Media & Technology Group, Donald Trump’s media group responsible for Truth Social. According to an SEC filing, the subpoenas are an effort to gather more information about “Digital World’s S-1 filings, communications with or about multiple individuals, and information regarding Rocket One Capital.”

Advertisement

Deepfake job apps: The FBI this week issued a warning that deepfakes are being used along with stolen information to apply for jobs. A part of this even involves video interviews. “In these interviews, the actions and lip movement of the person seen interviewed on-camera do not completely coordinate with the audio of the person speaking. At times, actions such as coughing, sneezing, or other auditory actions are not aligned with what is presented visually,” the FBI said in a statement announcing the disturbing news.

Party pooper: Welp, that 2020-era indefinite ban on unauthorized parties at Airbnbs is now permanent. This means no open-invitation parties and no parties whose attendance exceeds 16. The company said in a blog post that since they instituted the ban 2 years ago, there was a 44% year-over-year decrease in the rate of party reports. There will be no partying on, Garth.

Human And Artificial Intelligence Cooperating Concept

Image Credits: DrAfter123 / Getty Images

audio stuff

Over on the TechCrunch Podcast Network, Christine Tao, founder of Sounding Board, joined Darrell and Jordan on Found to talk about difficulties she and her co-founder faced while fundraising and how they established the customer type that made scaling possible.

And on the Wednesday episode of Equity, Natasha Mascarenhas asked a question inspired by a recent post penned by TC’s own Rebecca Szkutak: What’s in the fine print for term sheets these days, and what does that tell us about who is going to be in control during the downturn?

Check out our full roundup.

added stuff

Want even more TechCrunch? Head on over to the aptly named TechCrunch+, where we get to go a bit deeper on the topics our subscribers tell us they care about. Some of the good stuff from this week includes:

The SEC rejected bitcoin spot ETFs again. Now what?
The SEC’s decisions aren’t a first for the industry; the government agency has denied over a dozen bitcoin spot ETFs in the past year alone while approving several bitcoin future-based ETFs, Jacquelyn Melinek reports.

Disclose your Scope 3 emissions, you cowards
Tim De Chant takes on the companies that claim they’re serious about carbon emissions. In short, if they’re serious, then they’ll estimate their Scope 3 emissions and not undermine attempts to make Scope 3 disclosures standard.

Pitch Deck Teardown: Wilco’s $7 million seed deck
Haje’s back with another pitch deck teardown, this week from Wilco, a company whose funding he covered last week. He is pretty excited about Wilco’s deck, as, he says, it’s 19 slides that tick all of the boxes.

Image Credits: Wilco (opens in a new window)

Advertisement


Continue Reading

Business

Exclusive: Kohl's says a real estate sale is on the table after scrapping deal talks – TalkOfNews.com

Published

on

By

Kohl's says a real estate sale is on the table after scrapping deal talks

#Kohl039s #real #estate #sale #table #scrapping #deal #talks

People walk near a Kohl’s department store entranceway on June 07, 2022 in Doral, Florida.

Joe Raedle | Getty Images

Kohl’s might not be selling its business after all. But it’s now looking to sell some of its real estate, reversing its prior stance.

The retailer on Friday announced it terminated deal talks with The Vitamin Shoppe owner Franchise Group, confirming CNBC’s reporting from Thursday evening. Instead, Kohl’s said, it will continue to operate as a standalone public company.

Kohl’s for months has been pressured by activist firms including Macellum Advisors to consider a sale of the company, in large part to unlock the value tied up in Kohl’s real estate.

Macellum has argued that Kohl’s should sell some of its real estate and lease it back as a way to unlock capital, particularly during tough times. Kohl’s, however, has been resistant to so-called sale leaseback transactions, at least at such a large scale.

The company did complete a small sale-leaseback deal earlier on in the Covid pandemic, according to Peter Boneparth, chair of Kohl’s board. It recognized a gain of $127 million by selling and leasing back its San Bernardino e-commerce fulfillment and distribution centers.

On Friday, though, Kohl’s explicitly noted in its press release that its board is currently reevaluating ways that the retailer can monetize its real estate. Franchise Group had been planning to finance a portion of its Kohl’s acquisition by selling a chunk of Kohl’s real estate to another party and then leasing it back. This likely gave Kohl’s an idea of what sort of value it could fetch for its owned bricks-and-mortar stores and distribution centers.

Advertisement

“Now you’ve got an environment where financing has changed so much that it may in fact be more attractive to use real estate as a monetization vehicle,” Boneparth told CNBC in a phone interview.

“When you combine that with what we think the levels of the stock are, it becomes a much different exercise than it was in a previous financing environment,” he explained. “It’s no secret that Kohl’s has a very big asset on the balance sheet: Real estate.”

As of Jan. 29, Kohl’s owned 410 locations, leased another 517 and operated ground leases on 238 of its shops. All of its owned real estate was valued at a little more than $8 billion at that time, an annual filing shows.

Pros and cons

Proponents of sale-leaseback deals argue it’s a convenient way for companies to come up with funds to put toward future growth, so long as there is a buyer for the real estate. But it also leaves the seller with having to meet lease obligations since they would be renting the property they just sold.

Those leases could become much more difficult to break and rents can fluctuate across markets. Kohl’s said in its annual filing that a typical store lease has an initial term of 20 to 25 years, with four to eight five-year renewal options.

In 2020, Big Lots reached a deal with private-equity real estate firm Oak Street to raise $725 million from selling four company-owned distribution centers and leasing them back. It gave the big-box retailer additional liquidity during near the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Also in 2020, Bed Bath & Beyond completed a sale-leaseback transaction with Oak Street, in which it sold about 2.1 million square feet of commercial real estate and netted $250 million in proceeds. Mark Tritton, the Bed Bath CEO at the time, touted the deal as a move to raise capital to invest back in the business. Now, though, Bed Bath is facing another cash crunch as its sales slump and Tritton was ousted from his role earlier this week.

Oak Street had been planning to offer financing to Franchise Group in a Kohl’s deal, CNBC previously reported, according to a person familiar with the discussions. A representative from Oak Street didn’t respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Kohl’s on Friday reaffirmed its plan to conduct a $500 million accelerated stock buyback later this year. It reduced its revenue guidance for the fiscal second quarter, citing a recent softening in consumer demand amid decades-high inflation.

“Clearly the the consumer is under even more pressure today,” Kohl’s CEO Michelle Gass told CNBC in a phone interview. “We’re not immune to that … but Kohl’s stands for value. And at times like this it’s more important than ever to amplify that message.”

She added that Kohl’s partnerships with Amazon and Sephora remain in place and part of the company’s longer-term strategy to win over new customers.

Advertisement

“The conclusion of the board process was absolutely the right answer,” she said.

Kohl’s shares ended Friday trading down nearly 20% and at one point touched a new 52-week low of $27.65. Shares of Franchise Group ended the day down 7.5% and also touched a new 52-week low of $31.67 during trading.

Macellum didn’t respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Continue Reading

Exclusive

Copyright © 2022 Talk Of News.