Goodbye and Good Riddance To the 16:9 Aspect Ratio

One of the biggest trends coming out of this year's CES wasn't something people will necessarily notice at first glance unless they look closely. From a report: After enduring years of cramped, "widescreen" laptop displays, it looks like we're finally starting to say goodbye to the 16:9 aspect ratio. [...] The aspect ratios you'll typically see on laptops are 16:9, 3:2, 16:10 (which, for whatever reason, is called 16:10 rather than 8:5), and (occasionally) 4:3. 16:9 is the most common option and also the one with the lowest amount of vertical space relative to its horizontal space. [...] But this CES showed that 16:10 and 3:2 displays are inching closer to the mainstream. These are some of the biggest laptops announced at the show that are offering non-16:9 display options: HP Elite Folio (1920 x 1280, 3:2) Dell Latitude 9420 2-in-1 (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkBook Plus Gen 2 (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo Legion 7 and Legion 5 Pro (2560 x 1600, 16:10) LG Gram 17 and Gram 16 (2650 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo IdeaPad 5 Pro (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Titanium Yoga (2256 x 1504, 3:2) Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 9 and X1 Yoga Gen 6 (up to 3840 x 2400, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkPad X12 Detachable (1920 x 1280, 3:2) Asus ROG Flow X13 (up to 3840 x 2400, 16:10) That doesnâ(TM)t mean there are no 16:9 displays left â" plenty of laptops still use it, and probably will for the foreseeable future. And some of these devices, like the LG Grams, were 16:10 already. But it's significant that a large number of the flagships we'll be seeing in the first half of 2021 will be either 16:10 or 3:2. In fact, when you include MSI's 16:10 Summit E13 Flip and Razer's 16:10 Razer Book 13 (both of which were announced prior to CES), I can't think of a mainstream consumer laptop company that isn't now selling a non-16:9 flagship-level machine. It's clear that companies across the board are moving toward laptops with taller aspect ratios, and I fully expect to see more of them in the years to come. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Goodbye and Good Riddance To the 16:9 Aspect Ratio

One of the biggest trends coming out of this year's CES wasn't something people will necessarily notice at first glance unless they look closely. From a report: After enduring years of cramped, "widescreen" laptop displays, it looks like we're finally starting to say goodbye to the 16:9 aspect ratio. [...] The aspect ratios you'll typically see on laptops are 16:9, 3:2, 16:10 (which, for whatever reason, is called 16:10 rather than 8:5), and (occasionally) 4:3. 16:9 is the most common option and also the one with the lowest amount of vertical space relative to its horizontal space. [...] But this CES showed that 16:10 and 3:2 displays are inching closer to the mainstream. These are some of the biggest laptops announced at the show that are offering non-16:9 display options: HP Elite Folio (1920 x 1280, 3:2) Dell Latitude 9420 2-in-1 (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkBook Plus Gen 2 (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo Legion 7 and Legion 5 Pro (2560 x 1600, 16:10) LG Gram 17 and Gram 16 (2650 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo IdeaPad 5 Pro (2560 x 1600, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Titanium Yoga (2256 x 1504, 3:2) Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Gen 9 and X1 Yoga Gen 6 (up to 3840 x 2400, 16:10) Lenovo ThinkPad X12 Detachable (1920 x 1280, 3:2) Asus ROG Flow X13 (up to 3840 x 2400, 16:10) That doesnâ(TM)t mean there are no 16:9 displays left â" plenty of laptops still use it, and probably will for the foreseeable future. And some of these devices, like the LG Grams, were 16:10 already. But it's significant that a large number of the flagships we'll be seeing in the first half of 2021 will be either 16:10 or 3:2. In fact, when you include MSI's 16:10 Summit E13 Flip and Razer's 16:10 Razer Book 13 (both of which were announced prior to CES), I can't think of a mainstream consumer laptop company that isn't now selling a non-16:9 flagship-level machine. It's clear that companies across the board are moving toward laptops with taller aspect ratios, and I fully expect to see more of them in the years to come.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.